Trees & Disease

  Like humans, trees are susceptible to disease. For example, the tall American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) just behind Agnes Scott Hall suffers from bacterial leaf scorch. Sometimes the effects of a disease can be catastrophic. Early in the 20th century, … Continue reading

Carbon Sinks

Question: how is a southern red oak (Quercus falcata) like Atlanta’s Lake Lanier? Answer: just as a reservoir stores water, an oak stores carbon. Photosynthesis is the process by which a tree uses sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into new … Continue reading

Psychological Benefits

Student Kimberly Reeves ’12, project coordinator of the Agnes Scott Arboretum, talks about the psychological benefits of trees. Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica ‘Oconee’) is a dioecious (di-ee-shus) tree species. Some individuals are male, some female. When a tree has both … Continue reading

Practical Benefits

On your walk through this campus arboretum, you will learn about the many ways that trees affect us. They structure the way we think, improve water and air quality, assist scientists in climate and other types of research, inspire artists, … Continue reading