Shape & Structure

  President Elizabeth Kiss talks about about shape and structure of trees.    This archway is dedicated to James Ross McCain, second president of Agnes Scott College. Look through the east window. It frames a large and beautiful American beech … Continue reading

Historic Ash Tree

Jim Abbot, adjunct professor of classics, talks about Agnes Scott’s historic white ash. This immense white ash (Fraxinus americana, next to the parking lot) is thought to be older even than the College, founded in 1889. These trees can live … Continue reading

Trees & Disease

  Like humans, trees are susceptible to disease. For example, the tall American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) just behind Agnes Scott Hall suffers from bacterial leaf scorch. Sometimes the effects of a disease can be catastrophic. Early in the 20th century, … Continue reading

Incense Cedar

  “Lost in thought” is not the best way to experience a tree. This incense cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) rewards our full attention, if we stay mindful of our present experience of this tree. We can see the cinnamon-colored bark and … Continue reading

Carbon Sinks

Question: how is a southern red oak (Quercus falcata) like Atlanta’s Lake Lanier? Answer: just as a reservoir stores water, an oak stores carbon. Photosynthesis is the process by which a tree uses sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into new … Continue reading

Psychological Benefits

Student Kimberly Reeves ’12, project coordinator of the Agnes Scott Arboretum, talks about the psychological benefits of trees. Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica ‘Oconee’) is a dioecious (di-ee-shus) tree species. Some individuals are male, some female. When a tree has both … Continue reading

Tree Canopy

Associate Professor of Astronomy Amy Lovell talks about “Tree Canopy.” Sometimes it helps to look at things from a new perspective. You are standing on the Celestial Spheres plaza of the Bradley Observatory and Delafield Planetarium. Look down. If the … Continue reading