Historic Ash Tree

Jim Abbot, adjunct professor of classics, talks about Agnes Scott’s historic white ash. This immense white ash (Fraxinus americana, next to the parking lot) is thought to be older even than the College, founded in 1889. These trees can live … Continue reading

Living Fossils

Administrative assistant Rachel Garner talks about living fossils. Charles Darwin coined the term “living fossil.” It describes a species that has survived with little apparent change over a great span of time. Paleontologists recognize the fan-shaped leaf of the ginkgo … Continue reading

Biodiversity

Here along West College Avenue are three “theme houses,” where the student residents explore focused topics such as public health or dance, while enjoying themed activities beyond the classroom. Shading these homes is a magnificent grove of white oaks (Quercus … Continue reading

Georgia Trees

The northwest corner of the campus is Georgia in miniature. More than 30 tree species grow here, including such Georgia natives as sassafras (Sassafras albidum), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), overcup oak (Quercus lyrata), water oak (Quercus nigra), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), … Continue reading

Dieckmann Magnolias

From the porch of Rebekah Hall, you can see history still in the making, growing and ever-changing. In a letter to the College, alumna Adele Dieckmann McKee ’48 retells the stories she heard from her father about planting trees on … Continue reading

Practical Benefits

On your walk through this campus arboretum, you will learn about the many ways that trees affect us. They structure the way we think, improve water and air quality, assist scientists in climate and other types of research, inspire artists, … Continue reading